On Reading: Second Year DMBA

As I wrap my head around the topics we covered throughout the DMBA, I’ve found it helpful to remember and assess the materials we used, including books. It should be noted that many of the courses heavily used articles and HBR case studies, which I’m not going to endeavor to list. Perhaps there will be a “best of” article list someday. Here’s the comprehensive book list from year two:

Brand Strategy:

Managerial Finance:

  • Financial Management, 13th Edition, Eugene F. Brigham, Michael C. Ehrhardt
  • Various HBR case studies

Operations:

Experience Studio:

Venture Studio:

Strategic Management:

Strategic Foresight: (Full reading list is too long to post, so I’m just posting the ones I selected or have read.)

Some of the books were wonderful, some forgettable, and there are a few books that I would never recommend. Books I have gone back to for reference include the Marty Neumeier selections, Blue Ocean Strategy (more the toolset than the book), Strategy Safari, and Kellogg on Branding.

A Natural History of the Senses and most of the strategic foresight books were enjoyable to read and provided a good sense of a field or concept, but haven’t been useful as references.

The concepts in The Lean Startup and Tribes have been useful and commonly referred to by practitioners I’ve spoken with, but both books could probably express their ideas in a few pages.

In my opinion, don’t bother with Operations Strategy or Experience Design 1.1. These books were not helpful, interesting, or useful. There are other, better ways to explore the content.

Second semester, I started to use Audible.com for some books, and would highly recommend listening to books at high speed. This method takes advantage of time running errands, baking, or cleaning. Good candidates for listening are books where the concept is more important than the prose, where storytelling isn’t key, and you won’t want to take copious notes. There’s a lot of stopping and starting involved in consuming books this way, and the high speed tends to lose nuance in the reader’s inflection. Although note taking isn’t super intuitive, I take notes on books in Audible through bookmarks and their speech recognition software. Because you can’t read the text, it’s harder to note specific sentences.